Running Basics

Welcome To Gnotri

Welcome To Gnotri

Running Basics

Running Form and Posture

Running form and posture are the beginning, the middle and the end to every successful runner and run distance. It doesn’t matter if you are new to fitness run training or a seasoned runner with many races distances under your belt, good form and posture techniques will be the center of your run and fitness goals.

First, do your own review of the direction of your toes. We understand it is a natural tendency for your foot to angle out or in but rarely directly in front as your foot strikes the surface. They should be directly in front of your arch and your heel.. Proper foot strike can happen fore, heel or neutral just remember shoes are designed to maximize impact on the heel.

Many distance runners will opt for the heel to neutral strike roll to limit leg fatigue over the length the distance. If you have a fore foot strike try to adjust your strike to include a secondary impact to your heel. Consider a slight forward lean, not from your shoulders and head but from your core. Allow the weight of your torso to gently add momentum to your pace.

That’s right core strength, your lower torso and hip area transition leg turnover, balance, diaphram control to your upper body. Your upper body control should include relaxed shoulders and proper arm swing counter to your leg stride. Our suggestion to you is to practice these techniques gradually and at half speed.

Interval Training

The object to successful training is to indentify the right intensity to train at to maximize your performance. Intervals or repeats help us define your current race potential, how to incorporate leg turnover and speed to your workout and then to manage your race goal speed. Interval training combined with low intensity base training and tempo workouts below your lactate threshold are essential to help you meet your race goals.

Repeats are the most demanding and stressful to your body. You can do these workouts on a track, on a measured road or a treadmill. Depending on the length of your event interval distances can include 200m, 400m, 800m, combined 1000m/600m, and the mile. Each repeat should include jog recovery that equals to of half of the distance of the repeat. Intervals can be based on time instead of distance, example: 1 min on/1 min. recovery, 2min on/1 min recovery etc.

If you design your interval workouts yourself always err on the side of caution. Fewer sets and the length of the workout should be considered. As you can sustain your assigned pace you can slowly add the number of sets to your workout. Because of the intensity and stress associated with this phase of your training we suggest a structured program.